Archive for the ‘FOGRA’ Category

Brilliant colors true to the original on a premium surface – that ̓s what distinguishes a high-quality print product. Many elements in prepress and printing impact on a product ̓s color fidelity. The various input and output units in a print shop ̓s production process, consumables and other factors can cause deviations in color. A consistently employed color management system eliminates this problem.

In this series of blog tips we ̓ll show you the most common sources of error and give you tips on color management. We ̓re pleased to have caught your interest.

Step 1: Choose Consumables

Consumables have a very large influence on the print result. Deciding on set materials creates a basis and defines the boundaries. Changing consumables produces new results, which may necessitate recalibration. Thorough planning is, therefore, required. Examples of consumables include:

 Printing stocks

 Inks

 Blankets and underlays

 Dampening solution (additional amount + IPA)

 Printing plates and development chemicals

 Proofing paper and ink

1. printing plates

Different levels of dot gain can be generated depending on the water flow and ink absorption. This can cause the color dimensions to lie within or outside the range of tolerance depending on the type of printing plate, even when the same ink is used.

a. Printing plate type A: Color dimensions within the range of tolerance

b. Printing plate type B: Color dimensions outside the range of tolerance

2. Inks

Different inks can generate different levels of dot gain. This can cause color dimensions to lie within or outside the range of tolerance depending on the ink that is used.

c. Ink type A: Color dimensions within the range of tolerance

d. Ink type B: Color dimensions outside the range of tolerance

To be continued…

With reference Heidelberg Profitip series…

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Speaking Color

You’re late for a meeting with the designer who is redoing your offices. On the way into the conference room, you pass a colleague who says the new colors are “gross.” You enter the room and get a full presentation on a grey and mauve color scheme that looks really nice to you. Later, you ask your colleague about her comment and discover that “gross” actually meant “out of fashion.”

If we could get inside each other’s heads, communication about color would be more accurate. Since we can’t, we must fall back on language to describe what we perceive. There are some, like Mary Buckley, an artist and educator, who believe this is a good thing. She says that “detecting and naming attributes is basic to developing an understanding of light and color.”

Indeterminate, or nonmeasurable, attributes, such as shocking pink and clear-sky blue, are more than just adjectives. They are terms we use to explain the effect a color has on us. They are the words we use to describe our state of mind as we experience colors. Buckley is among a growing number of colorists and designers who believe that naming the intent of a space through the use of indeterminate attributes must occur before any discussion of specific colors. Users should first respond to the question “What should the space feel like?”

The subjective responses to this question will direct designers in their color choices. Sometimes these indeterminate attributes verge on a synesthetic response: They use the language of one sense to describe the perception of another, as in loud pink and tart green. But perhaps the most interesting attributes we commonly use are warm (reds, oranges, and yellows) and cool (greens, blues, and purples). These divisions are deeply embedded in our thinking, as evidenced by the red faucet for hot water and the blue for cold found in most washrooms, even though the actual temperature of red light is cooler than that of blue light.

With the advent of the Industrial Revolution, however, the focus shifted away from a reliance on language to communicate color. In order for manufacturers with plants scattered around the country to maintain color consistency in their products, they began searching for a new technology that would provide accurate color definition. During the last half of the nineteenth century, several people developed more precise ways to describe specific colors. They based their work on three basic, universal, measurable characteristics of color: 1) which spectral category it belongs to; 2) how light or dark a color is; and 3) how brilliant or dull it is.

Color terms for these characteristics vary. Some use the distinctions warm/cool, light/dark, and brilliant/dull. Others speak of hue, value, and chroma. Hue is the basic name of a color, such as red, yellow, green, or blue. Value indicates how light or dark a color is. Chroma is the amount of hue in a color. For example, vermilion has a great deal of red but pink has very little. Munsell’s System describes color in three dimensions. The American art educator Albert Munsell (1858-1918) developed the widely used

Munsell Color System, which arranges all colors on the basis of their appearance.

He was the first to call the three main characteristics of color “hue,” “value,” and “chroma,” likening them to a musical note’s pitch, tone, and intensity. Others, such as the German chemist Wilhelm Ostwald (1853-1932), developed color systems based on different scientific principles. But all color systems share one common feature—they all map the three characteristics of color in three dimensions on XYZ axes. According to Sloane, “Dimensions beyond these three exist, although we do not know how to incorporate a fourth or further spatial dimension into the model graphically. Colors, for example, can vary in shininess of surface. The Munsell System acknowledges this parameter but suggests no way to incorporate it into the three-dimensional color solid.”

(More to continue.. Enjoy reading of

Brilliant colors true to the original on a premium surface – that ̓s what distinguishes a high-quality print product. Many elements in prepress and printing impact on a product ̓s color fidelity. The various input and output units in a print shop ̓s production process, consumables and other factors can cause deviations in color. A consistently employed color management system eliminates this problem.

In this series of blog tips we ̓ll show you the most common sources of error and give you tips on color management. We ̓re pleased to have caught your interest.

Step 1: Choose Consumables

Consumables have a very large influence on the print result. Deciding on set materials creates a basis and defines the boundaries. Changing consumables produces new results, which may necessitate recalibration. Thorough planning is, therefore, required. Examples of consumables include:

 Printing stocks

 Inks

 Blankets and underlays

 Dampening solution (additional amount + IPA)

 Printing plates and development chemicals

 Proofing paper and ink

Grades of paper

The ISO 12647-2 standard defines the specifications for 5 different grades

of paper.

Paper Grade Description

1. gloss coated, woodfree, 115 gsm

2. matt coated, woodfree, 115gsm

3. gloss coated, LWC*, 70 gsm

4. uncoated, white, 115 gsm

5. uncoated, slightly yellowish, 115 gsm

A multitude of possibilities

Different prepress and print processes as well as different materials all produce different results! It is, therefore, essential to coordinate all processes and limit the options for coloring.

To be continued…

Is your system V4-ready?

We have a simple test you can use. The two test pages provided here (one in HTML, one in PDF) have ICC Version 4 profiles embedded in their image data.

The test pages demonstrate how various applications, such as your browser or PDF viewer, handle Version 4 ICC profiles.

Follow these steps:

  1. Verify that your application settings haven’t disabled color management. The preferences may include options for turning color management on, and for preserving profiles embedded in documents. See your application documentation for how to do this. Many applications lack user settable controls for color management.
  2. Open one or both of these pages in the application you want to test.
  3. If possible also print these pages, as your printing system doesn’t always match the abilities of the application.
  4. Compare the test image with the example results shown on the test page, to determine if your system is using the profiles correctly.

If the application doesn’t display or print the pages correctly, first verify again that you have not disabled color management, then check with your vendor for available upgrades. Some applications provide their own color management, while other applications use operating system services, such as ICM or ColorSync. In the latter case you may need to upgrade the operating system.

You can also test your image editing applications using the images that make up the test image. Using your browser save each part of the test image to disk as a separate image file, then follow the steps above.

This test is not exhaustive. For example, it doesn’t test CMYK profiles, and it doesn’t test all possible contexts where ICC profiles are used, such as monitor profiles.

This test does not test that your system is properly calibrated. It generates an extremely big difference between correct and incorrect colors, enabling you to evaluate the results even if your system is not properly calibrated.

Brilliant colors true to the original on a premium surface – that ̓s what distinguishes a high-quality print product. Many elements in prepress and printing impact on a product ̓s color fidelity. The various input and output units in a print shop ̓s production process, consumables and other factors can cause deviations in color. A consistently employed color management system eliminates this problem.

In this series of blog tips we ̓ll show you the most common sources of error and give you tips on color management. We ̓re pleased to have caught your interest.

The 8 Steps of the color management process

Many factors contribute to successful color management – from consumables, through the test print and up to the monitoring results. This section looks at the individual elements and how to optimize processes step by step in order to achieve the desired end quality:

1. Choose consumables

2. Determine production conditions

3. Optimize prepress

4. Optimize the printing press

5. Print and evaluate test form

6. Calibrate processes

7. Generate ICC color profiles

8. Check color management procedures

icc is the abbreviation for the international color consortium, a consortium made up of many manufacturers of graphic, image processing and layout programs. the consortium’s goal is the standardization of color management systems. an icc profile (color profile) is a standardized data set that describes the color space for color input or color reproduction units such as scanners, monitors and printers.

Brilliant colors true to the original on a premium surface – that ̓s what distinguishes a high-quality print product. Many elements in prepress and printing impact on a product ̓s color fidelity. The various input and output units in a print shop ̓s production process, consumables and other factors can cause deviations in color. A consistently employed color management system eliminates this problem.

In this series of blog tips we ̓ll show you the most common sources of error and give you tips on color management. We ̓re pleased to have caught your interest.

Requirements

To ensure successful color management, certain requirements must be met and work steps followed beforehand:

1. Once an order has been accepted, the data must be checked:

• Image resolution 304.8 dpi@150 lpi

• Chromaticity 4c + possibly special colors

• File format PDF X3

• Fonts should be embedded

2. Printing plates are initially linearized:

• Tonal values are transferred 1:1. 50% in the file corresponds to 50% on the printing plate.

3. Computer to plate (CtP) is recommended for an ideal transfer of tonal values.

4. An ideally set printing press and standardized work are essential! The printing press must be maintained and set according to Manufacturer guidelines.

5. The climate of the pressroom and paper storeroom must be kept constant.

In this series of blog tips, We will give you some information on the critical importance of the rollers for the quality and efficiency of your print processes. We are sure you will find this of great interest.

Shore Hardness

• In line with their task of transferring ink, inking rollers must be adjusted to be oil-friendly (or oleophilic). In an inking system with conventional inks, rollers of Shore A hardness between 30° and 35° are used. For UV inks, rollers with Shore A hardness of 25° and between 40° and 45° are used.

• Dampening rollers should be water-friendly (hydrophilic). For alcohol dampening systems, Shore A hardness of between 25° and 30° is suitable. In direct dampening systems, hard rubber rollers are used.

The Shore hardness of a roller determined with a Shore meter designates the resistance against penetration of a needle taking the form of either a conic section (Shore A) or a point (Shore D), pressed with a defined force (1 kp) for a period of three seconds against the rubber surface. Soft rollers are measured with Shore A, and hard rollers with Shore D. The general hardness tolerances according to DIN/EN are +/- 5° Shore A

Shore hardness can be easily measured and gives the printer information on the condition of the rollers. Rollers tend to become harder with use, as they are exposed to inks, dampening agents and detergents, as well as the atmosphere. Additional hardening of 5° Shore in the first months of use should be regarded as normal. Accelerated hardening in use can be a sign that the rollers are gradually shrinking. If you adjust a roller that has been subject to hardening and shrinkage to its original gap width, it may well be that its original transfer characteristics will be reproduced. At the same time, however, the gap width is closer than previously. This leads to higher pressure and higher temperatures – and thereby to higher wear on the roller.

Increased hardness can also indicate that a hard film of paper coating and dampening agents has become deposited on the roller surface. This film should be regularly removed to prevent the roller hardening and glazing with use. The clean and satin-like surface of a roller is even more important than its hardness.